About Arnie “Prompt Criticality” Gundersen

“Arnie Gundersen, the sole engineer of Fairewinds Associates, continues to tell lies about the radiation released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. He also continues to lie about the potential effects and seeks to spread fear and uncertainty where neither one are justified. He is a dangerous man on a mission to make money by harming the industry that once employed him – until he was fired for poor performance of his assigned duties.” – Rod Adams [1]

March 2012 – Jim Stone

If the mainstream media wanted the facts, why did they pick this guy? Because he said what they wanted, truth be damned.

“We at Vermont Yankee are well acquainted with Arnie and his exaggerations. He plays to a public and a legislature that has zero knowledge of nuclear power or engineering and is willing to accept any negative claim as truth.” And since he gave an impossible “prompt criticality” explanation which diverted attention away from the only real explanation for the magnitude of the explosion at #3 – a nuke, they gave him a ton of air. Enough said.

Arnie Gundersen’s consulting firm, which has only him (no employees yet or ever, and therefore it’s easy to be “senior engineer”) was curiously founded within months of the release of the spider man villain Critical Mass, who, as Spider man’s fourth grade classmate went by the name of ARNIE GUNDERSE[O]N. Critical Mass had the ability to project explosions from his fingertips. Hmm, perhaps THAT gave birth to the “prompt criticality” in a 20% fuel pool when 90+ percent is needed for an explosion of any sort no matter what the circumstance? If you need 90 or more percent and you have only 20 percent, THE LAWS OF PHYSICS WILL BE OBEYED. Folks, In perfect form, the scamming media hunted out a fraud and rammed him down your throats. Arnie Gundersen has a phony company and was inspired in his fraud by a Spider Man comic. NO ONE at the college Arnie supposedly attended even heard of him, I went down that rabbit hole and the man is a mystery.

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